FAQs

Q?What is a doula?
A.

Since the days of the Ancient Greeks, expectant mothers have relied upon the emotional and physical support of a doula–a word that means “woman servant.” Sometimes called a “labor coach,” the role of the doula is to educate, support and empower the expectant mother to experience childbirth in the way that she envisions it. A doula can work in a variety of settings, be it a hospital, birthing center, or at home; she is there to provide continuous support during your labor, as well as to help you transition into new motherhood in the hours that follow. Your doula can facilitate open communication with your provider–obstetrician, family practice doctor or midwife–while representing your wishes for your birthing experience.

Q?If I am planning to have an epidural, why would I need a doula?
A.

Even though you will have an epidural, the labor is not pain-free, and you may need more help than a non-medicated mother during the pushing stage, especially if you cannot feel to push. A doula can also help by doing such things as reminding family to eat, getting extra pillows or ice chips, and especially, continuing to be reassuring and informative should complications arise.

Q?Do I need a doula?
A.

A doula oftentimes becomes a mother’s best friend throughout her pregnancy and labor, and provides intimate care to the mother and her baby. If you are interested in natural childbirth, a doula is a great partner to have in the birthing process.

Q?What does a doula do?
A.

Your doula’s main purpose is simply to be there for you, your baby, and your partner throughout the pregnancy and delivery. She can help you develop your birth plan, and during labor use numerous homeopathic techniques for effective pain management, such as massage and different labor positions to help you through delivery.

Q?Will my doula work with my OB/GYN or midwife?
A.

A doula can work with your OB/GYN and/or your midwife.

Q?What’s the difference between a doula and a midwife?
A.

A doula’s job is to coach and support the mother through childbirth, while a midwife is a medical professional trained and equipped to deliver the baby.

Q?Can I work with a doula if I have a hospital birth?
A.

Most doulas will assist births in a variety of locations including a home, birthing center or hospital.